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writerlibrarian

What I'm reading

Librarian, book lover, avid reader

Currently reading

Roman Blood
Steven Saylor
Progress: 171/401 pages
Dearie: The Remarkable Life of Julia Child
Bob Spitz
Progress: 208/557 pages
Avant-gardes du XXe siècle: arts & littérature, 1905-1930
Serge Fauchereau
Caesar's Commentaries: On the Gallic War and On the Civil War
Julius Caesar
Les bûchers de Bocanegra
Arturo Pérez-Reverte
The Songs of the Kings
Barry Unsworth
Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Novels and Stories: Volumes I and II
Arthur Conan Doyle
The Hobbit
J.R.R. Tolkien, Alan Lee

Eat the City: A Tale of the Fishers, Foragers, Butchers, Farmers, Poultry Minders, Sugar Refiners, Cane Cutters, Beekeepers, Winemakers, and Brewers Who Built New York

Eat the City: A Tale of the Fishers, Foragers, Butchers, Farmers, Poultry Minders, Sugar Refiners, Cane Cutters, Beekeepers, Winemakers, and Brewers Who Built New York - Robin Shulman Urban farming. Urban agriculture. A trendy and serious topic. Robin Shulman could have written an essay surfing on the 'hip' factor of the subject. Instead she chose to write about the people who are doing it, were doing it ages ago, people who do it to survive, to live differently. Eat the City is a very well documented, yet easy to read and engaging essay on the many, many ways agriculture survived, adapted and sometimes thrived in New York City through the histories of sugar, beer, city gardens, honey, meat, wine and fish. Robin Shulman focuses on the stories behind the trends like beekeeping, growing your own food, etc. You get a full picture of why, when, how beekeeping evolved in New York, same for the history of butchers and the meat packing districts (my favourite chapter of the whole book with the vegetable chapter not far behind). She doesn't shy away from giving the readers ample information and succeeds in not overwhelming them. For people who love to read about food, about how food changes and molds our lives. Bonus if you love to read about New York city because it's really the star of the book. This review was possible via a Netgalley advanced copy.